Kommetjie Sense of Place. A special character worth preserving

  • We don’t beg for street lights and we do urge residents to use private propertylighting discreetly
  • Guinea fowl and hadedas are welcome even if they are a bit noisy sometimes
  • Baboons are our neighbours and we try to live together harmoniously, but without encouraging them into the village with food and waste.
  • Milkwood trees are an important asset and should not be cut down or severely trimmed without permission and consultation. They give off a sweetish odour in February and we like it.
  • When the kelp decays on the beach as part of the natural cycle of things and is eaten by kelp flies and sandhoppers we do not urge the council to clean it up.
  • Pedestrians, bikes, skate boards, prams etc should get priority over carsand it is expected that people drive carefully.
  • Cape Dune mole rats inhabit open spaces and occasionally venture into gardens where they can cause damage but will not be exterminated en masse.
  • There is support for occasional village clean-ups, plantings, invasive alien plant removal and general housekeeping.
  • Many people like learning about or doing things that connect them more to the earth.
  • Recycling is popular and easy.
  • Access to open spaces like beaches, mountain and wetlands is highly valued and encroachment which in any way restricts this is strongly opposed.

And

  • The lighthouse built in 1919 shines at night and you might need thick curtains depending on your street address.
  • There are building regulations which we try to enforce as fairly as possible.
  • Visitors who respect, use and value the area are welcome irrespective of race, creed, age, gender or colour.
  • Kommetjie falls into a Marine Protected Area (MPA) and while fishing is allowed, a hard line is taken against poaching and destructive activities.
  • We are on the Atlantic coastline and respect this powerful ocean with its big waves and cold water.
  • Responsible dog ownership is encouraged. This includes noise and behaviour control and picking up after them.
  • Crayfish season from November to April is a busy, often noisy, period.
  • Most businesses are fairly close to houses and therefore loud noise and disturbances are frowned upon.